FROM RESOURCES TO PERFORMANCE: WORK ENGAGEMENT AND RESOURCES

Muhammad Farooq Jan

Abstract


Employee engagement has become an essential business construct for many leading organizations as an essential driver for efficiency and productivity. The study discusses the drivers of the work engagement and employee performance at workplace by considering different resources including job and individual resources on the bases of COR theory in Pakistan (OGDCL).Questioners containing 34 items which was adapted from A. B. Bakker, Demerouti, Evangelia, Oerlemans, Wido GM (2014)The Job Demands–Resources (JD-R) questionnaire. AMOS statistical package was used to draw the model and check the mediation of PR (personal resource) between job resources and work engagement. Results shows that personal resources and job resources effect the work engagement as mediating and independent factor respectively while work engagement make very minimum to job performance. Directions regarding areas for future research are given.

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